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Atomizzatore usato 3 mesi, confezione e accessori originali come da foto. Ritirabile di persona a Brescia e nelle vicinanze. Il Ronson standard è un accendino a benzina e venne fabbricato dal al quando venne introdotto il nuovo meccanismo "Essex". E' stato per anni il cavallo di battaglia della Ronson ed era molto diffuso tra i gentiluomini dell'epoca.

Questo accendino è stato realizzato in almeno 76 disegni. Il modello in vendita ha un disegno a righe verticali sulla faccia principale e ha la targhetta per le iniziali ancora vergine. Alcuni accendini Ronson standard non hanno il nome del modello 'standard' sul fondo e infatti questo non ce l'ha. Si tratta di un accendino made in USA Newark.

L'accendino è in ottime condizioni estetiche ed è perfettamente funzionante. Questo è un un accendino mitico prodotto negli anni ' He is the author of the first history of the old Italian film: IN , Arturo Ambrosio, a native of Turin, produced two films: It was then that the Italian cinema was born.

The smile of Marguerite of Savoy, photographed amidst the Alpine maneuvers, was truly Carduccian. These very brief films were among the marvels of the new era, though Charles Pathe's equally brief Quo Vadis? The young century had been presented with a charming new plaything. Alberini's patent was taken out in , the same year Lumiere's apparatus appeared, though the latter antedated his Italian colleague by some ten months. In the original model, the film moved intermittently in an arc before a revolving lens.

By this means, the photographic angle could be varied between 45 and 90 degrees. It was comprised of administration offices, a glass-roofed gallery and stages.

Another building housed the various workshops. The follow- ing year, the Alberini-Santoni Studio became Cines, whose president was Earnest Pacelli, administrator — Baron Fassini, and managing director — Albert Pouchain, an industrialist with sound ideas about the potentialities of the new medium. No judgment was passed on those first films, now nearly all vanished. One can only rely on memory, and what information survived the years is insufficient for appraisal.

The contemporary newspapers and periodicals of that era hardly mentioned them and there was, as yet, no specialized film press. The former won first prize in the first Italian film competition — a gold plaque presented by Lumiere.

With these two works, Italian film production was launched in the foreign markets. The settings can be said to have had a certain charming oleographic fidelity. The camera photographed the scenes at the rate of 12 frames a second, in contrast to the 24 frames a second now employed, so the action on the screen was considerably faster than is the case today, even allowing for the compensations in the speed of the early projection machines.

Fregoli used to project these little films at the end of his stage performances: Not content with the success he enjoyed with these films, he also wanted to make sound and talking films 25 years before the sound film came into actual being. Fregoli spoke the parts of each character and sang, when this was called for, to the accompaniment of the orchestra in the pit. Clearly, this ingenious fellow was not only a pioneer of the silent film but a precursor of the sound film as well.

And already the demand was exceeding the supply. The public was avid for films. By this time Turin had eleven public cinemas. The following month, a regular department of film criticism was inaugurated. In the same year, another cinema review was founded in Milan by Pietro Tonini.

The two novelties of the new age were launched — the film and the phonograph. Which was to last? Which had the bigger future? At any rate, from the start the public was avid for both. Although Pathe and Gaumont in France led the field, the Italian film industry was not far behind.

Most of the films of this period were between and feet. The Luca Comerio enterprise in Milan, under the management of the brilliant journalist and comedy-writer, Mario Marais, soon was at the head of the cinema movement in Italy.

Cafe-Chantant, another of the now mushrooming cinema reviews in Italy, lists some of the productions of the time, testifying at least to the multiplicity of tastes. Fantasies in the sense of story films of the imagination comprised: These films ran from the feet of Medoro al Telefono Medoro at the Telephone to the feet of Cenerentola Cinderella , both by Pathe.

Cafe-Chantant does not mention the ac- tivities at this time of the Partenope Film Company. Exciting scenes of the deepest devotion and patriotism! The action unfolds in five scenes, each based on a reconstruction of historical truth on a lavish scale! In all this there is no mention of any actor or actress, no tragedian or comedian, not even the name of a producer or director. The film itself was the thing, and it had its own novelty, its magic, its own power to attract. The players were regarded as mountebanks from the music halls and variety theatres, or nondescript extras fished from a vast, anonymous sea, women of dubious abode and profession, and men with more or less fatal charm, depending on the age of the female spectator.

What were these first films like? Against cardboard sets actors gesticulated wildly to express their meaning for the benefit of even the most backward members of any audience.

Collapsing bridges were still a thing of the future, as were trains hurtling down hillsides or crashing into each other, or boats capsizing in storms.

The action was strictly governed by what could be shot on a stage and by stage directions: The camera was the fourth wall of the stage and this area was inviolate, never to be approached by the players. In the comedies, the players frisked and bounced like the harlequins in the Commedia dell'Arte, or like clowns in the circus.

People jumped from windows and furniture flew through the air. The film counterpart to the romantic novel or novella had its own style, too: Who can forget the beauteous Lyda Borelli hesitating on the doorstep?

Developments were rapid, both in choice of subject matter, which now began to be drawn from history and literature, and complexity of staging. The historical reconstructions and assaults on the picaresque adventure novel, as well as on epic poems, on the tragedies of Shakespeare, Dante et al, enlivened the new film fare considerably after the first novelty of pictures moving wore off.

Cines produced Beatrice Cenci, Joan of Arc, Lucrezia Borgia these last two were to become hardy perennials everywhere. All these date between New film producing companies kept pace with the ever increasing public demand. In in Rome the Film d'Arte Italiana was started, sponsored by Pathe, whose products were fashioned after the French film d'art. By there were twenty-two film companies in Turin and twenty-four in Rome.

This was the historical film which re-created antiquity in terms of the most expressive film imagery of the time. Rome, Florence, Venice, Naples ; tales of history and fantasy adored by the masses. With candor and ardor, and its new- found agility, it bravely confronted the passionate epics of Homer, Wagner and D'Annunzio. Francis by the ubiquitous Guazzoni.

We do not, of course, wish him ill, but if he is as hale and hearty as he seems to be, who knows what further inventions we may have to fear from his implacable scientific imagination? The theatre, which has been trying. All of legend and history, the whole poetry of the past, is now at the mercy of film makers and third rate actors.

The white screen in the darkness only serves to bear witness to the triumph of vulgarity and the growing tyranny of bad taste. In this review we begin to see signs of a definite and more mature cinema conscience. It was one of the first Italian cinema reviews to initiate a regular and comprehensive critical service with regard to current films being shown in the various centers of film production of Italy by means of a group of correspondents.

On the home front, meanwhile, production continued unabated with Cesarini's ineffectual Dante and Beatrice, followed by Ambrosio's own The Promised Bride and a second version by Pasquali.

By this time films were as long as feet. In Hoc Signo Vinces, the longest of them all, ran to feet. In Rome, all film activity centered around the lively intelligence of Passini.

It was the era of Adminis- trative Councils and art committees, each with its own axe to grind in this fertile new ground, if we may be permitted a mixed metaphor.

This Senator or that Deputy had a lady friend who would like to get into the movies. The right word to the right person. Lawyers, esthetes, and even political columnists found their way into the studios, with the resultant nepotism, jealousies and bribes following in their wake.

But the cinema has always had a tough constitution and it survived this sort of thing from the very beginning. Time has not dimmed the memory of its turbulent images, its great masses handled so fluidly, its barbaric circuses, Ursus among real lions, a really monstrous Nero, the whole giving a vertiginous effect through knowing direction. Did it contain exaggerations? Were its esthetics of the picture post-card standard?

Was its technique not more than the perfec- tion of mediocrity? It is enough that Quo Vadis? Every country's cinema has expressed, and will continue to express, that country's artistic traditions, a national temper- ament that transmutes itself into a particular style. One cannot, therefore, denigrate Quo Vadis?

The narrative had unity, the shots were original and boldly visualized, and the captions were not a substitute for action. It was Quo Vadis? That certain painters who failed to exhibit their work suc- cessfully then turned to the cinema is undeniable. But this much at least should be conceded.

The influence of Guazzoni, who may have failed at or renounced painting, was, in fact, a nota- ble event for the cinema.

In a pictorial art such as the cinema, the painter's influence had much to offer, such as theories of composition, lighting, grouping, balance and design. After the success of Quo Vadis? Real wild beasts, no fakes! Film battles, one knows, are with- out actual bloodshed, but wild beasts are no joke. The single timid lion, probably more frightened than were his spectators, who appeared in Pasquali's Spartacus, was a far cry indeed from the ferocious beasts in Quo Vadis?

It was the moment of shivers and goosepimples in the cinema. But the background was always historical or classical, as in Anthony and Cleopatra and Ju- lius Caesar, both produced by the indefatigable Guazzoni in , The Last Days of Pompeii, etc. And all the while, silently, but monumentally, the great Cabiria was in production.

Some of the minor spectacles of this period, when viewed recently, have elicited praise even today. The Last Days of Pompeii, that hardy perennial, which has almost defied criticism through the years, appeared in four different versions before , two by Ambrosio the first in , and others by Pasquali and Caserini. Eventually it was to be done a fifth time in Italy by L'Herbier. The actors were now the masters. Male and female tragedians, with plastered forelocks and heroic or seductive gestures, called out from their lurid posters to the man in the street.

Film companies raided other film companies for wanted stars; producers battled with stars and vice- versa. Lawyers, the stars' patrons and journalists were jubilant. This was a field day for them.

Law courts meant money within reach. And if today we smile at these once famous stars, now of such dim renown, actors with the obvious masks of enchanters or seducers, and actresses with their equally obvious abundance of snaky charms, let us not lose a sense of perspective in judging them.

An earlier generation was as moved by them as we are by their successors today, and tribute must be paid the techniques evolved in those rapturous, pioneering days. There, in the shades of night, is Emilio Ghione, that querulous knight of the taverns.

Names that once made hearts beat faster — or even skip a beat! The old Italian Commedia dell'Arte came to life once more before the cameras, displaying, as before, its astonishing inventiveness, sparkling improvisation and imaginative caprices, much as did those actors of the 15th to 18th centuries whom people flocked to see in the theatres, on improvised platforms here, there or anywhere, or in the public squares.

This year saw the appearance of Benelli's Gorgona The Gorgon , with Tina di Lorenzo and Anni- bale Ninchi, and — at long last — the massive Cabiria, simultaneously presented for its premiere in Turin and Milan and adorned with the elegant signature of Gabriele D'Annunzio, who suppli- ed the film's subject or, perhaps, only the subtitles. But, out of this welter of films, only one was to survive the test of time and become indissolubly 25 a part of the history of the motion pictures: Cabiria, produced and directed by Giovanni di Pastrone, whose professional name was Piero Fosco.

Filmed on a scale even surpassing Quo Vadis? Griffith in his Intolerance. With Cabiria a film still discussed for its style, originality and unity, Italy had made an important contri- bution to the new art of the film. Redol- ent with the era of ancient Egypt, Christus was a big success. The outbreak of the war did not at first halt work in the studios. Arrigo Frusta directed for Ambrosio an adaptation of Gerolamo Rovetta's drama, Romanticismo Romanticism , in which Tullio Carminati, dishevelled, suave and determined, appeared as Count Lamberti.

Memorable were the scenes shot at Lake Como with Carminati declaiming to cloaked conspirators! Martin , and another success by Guazzoni in , Madame T allien. So much, for the moment, for the costume film. There was also the filmed drama of passion. The hold of D'Annunzio on the cinema, not the D'Annunzio of the tragic poems, but of Intermezzo di rime and the novels, was tyrannical. The middle-class Italian film of a considerably later era, with its trysts on the Pincio, its cruel loves and furious embraces, its exquisite in- teriors and aristocratic entertainments, was blood-cousin to such social chronicles as Duke Minio, or the gallantries of Piacere Pleasure.

This was the Rome of magnificent esthetes and shameless coquettes, the cinema of the lover in monocle and top hat. The poet had, in fact, no real love for the cinema. He understood the secret of the new language but never developed for it an attentive or passionate curiosity. He saw very few films, was indifferent to the produc- tion of Cabiria even though it was to carry his name , and laughed at Leda senza cigno Leda Without Swan.

She fitted into this glamorous aura perfectly, an aura that was capable of transmuting even the dour Ibsen into purple D'Annunzio, as in Hedda Gabler, directed by Piero Fosco, and Satana Satan , in which Mario Bonnard played the devil in a top hat, eternally laughing, eternally smoking cigarettes among the ruins.

Hamlet, too, suc- cumbed to the fatal charm of the lyrical author of The Flame and was played not in its austere, traditional style, but by the elegant and esthetically irreproachable Ruggero Ruggeri. The first films in which the players wore the clothes of the day were: But the hit among them all, which which was to have reverberations for years to come, was But My Love Won't Die Directors, actors, authors were to remake that film for years.

Here, if ever, was a film waf- ted to the screen on the wings of the D'Annunzio myth. The protagonists meet in churches — he plays the organ, she passes the back of her hand across her fevered brow, trellised by its recalcitrant curls.

Girls dyed their hair orange and had themselves photographed with their hands folded under their chins. Ladies wrapped themselves in flowing garments, and little middle-class women adopted weary and disdainful attitudes.

We are now in 6 — amid a veritable avalanche of new films. Where, indeed, are the snows of yesteryear? Amleto Palermi directed La bella Salamandra The Beatiful Salamander and Madre Mother — again to presage a very famous subsequent film ; Car- mine Gallone who was subsequently to become another of Italy's foremost directors made Fogazzaro's Malombra, with the always welcome Lyda Borelli.

Yet the films which marked Italy's peak achievements by that time — Quo Vadis? Even before Pastrone moved his camera so momentously in Cabiria, Italian films had timidly begun to move the camera.

The importance of Ghione, as an example, was not understood by them. The film language is articulate, clear and fluent. The atmosphere in these films is one thing and their meaning another. The gestures of the players, to be fairly judged, must be considered as an element of film language and not as an expression of traditional movements.

It was in this that the early film critics went off on a tangent. The actor was of fundamental importance to the old cinema and to its success, perhaps even much more so than today.

Lyda Borelli — the admirable, nay, overwhelming, Lyda Borelli — gave a style to the bourgeoise genre, for style it certainly was. The camera was not yet expressive enough, so the actor, the great Italian actor, heir to all the masques, created his parts with a whimsical, carefree abandon, That wonderful art of theatrical improvisation, so felicitous in Italian comedy, was reborn in front of the camera.

Today, the actor facing the camera must obey the scenarist, or the origin- ality if peculiarity is not the right word! The Futurist, Marinetti, writing of the variety theatre in one of his manifestoes, said: There came from the stage to the early Italian cinema famous dramatic ac- tors, light opera singers, cabaret entertainers, comedians, acrobats and clowns, dialect comed- ians, etc.

I still see the white scowling mask of Ermete Novelli. There lingers, too, in my memory the placid 29 countenance of Oreste Calabresi and the dark, far from handsome visage of Giovanni Grasso, the gluttonous Camillo de Riso, Umberto Mozzato, Ignazio Lupi and Alfonso Cassini. I see again the films of the trapeze and the arena — with Luciano Albertini, Cambino, Pagano, Aldini, — and those with Ausonia, Saetta, Maciste and Ajax, the vertiginous acrobats, invincible wrestlers, fearless and honorable knights all!

I still see the death-jumps, the showers of blows, trains stopped from crashing by a hair's breadth. Sometimes, in a cafe, some dowager would be smitten by the gardenia or the necktie and Oreste took this as a sign to preen himself, smoothing and polish- ing himself until he was a shining gallant from the huge monocle stuck in his eye to his cream colored spats.

But the lady's husband invariably arrived, tall and fuming, with enormous, bloodthirsty moustaches, and Bilancia retired in dismay. He had the round, clerical face of a lonely bachelor consoled by excellent cooking. And I remember, too, the lean and twisted Za la Mort. As Ghione put it: Arsene Lupin was the rage in France as a gentleman-thief. We had to find an equivalent character to uphold the honor of our own production.

If Lupin was a gentleman- thief, Za la Mort would be a sentimental apache with noble feelings. As I played him, he lived amid violence, but hated all ugliness ; he loved violets and the poor, and melted with tenderness at the right time and the right place. Za la Mort was accompanied by Za la Vie, played by Sambucini. Ghione, wholly lacking in theatrical experience, was what was still better, an instinctive film actor. Za la Mort appeared briefly in Broadway in , the first stage -thril- ler in Italy.

It was then that the fashion began on the stage of depicting police chasing bandits amid utter confusion. Ghione even spoke a few lines. Kri-Kri cut his capers at Cines, too, and in 2 Tontolini became Polidor.

Can we say that our comic films were Italian? Perhaps we cannot claim a pure comic style of our own. These irresponsible farces, directed for the most part by the protagonists themselves, were full of whimsical invention that stemmed directly from the works of Labiche and Jules Verne, the music of Lecocq, the fantasy of Melies.

All the wedding guets who became cross with each other, and had fits of delirium in those little farces, belonged to the gay and giddy Paris vaudeville, or pochade — the same Parisian flavor once again concocted with such malicious humor by Rene Clair today One comic took the felicitous stage name of Jolicoeur, but no record remains of him, poor fellow. Cretinetti was rather short, with a long face and a lock of hair plastered down over eternally surprised eyes.

He looked a little like Buster Keaton He danced, instead of walking. Robinet was plump and elastic, looking for all the world like an innocent-eyed chef.

Verdannes is chiefly notable for his fierce jowls. Polidor slunk about, small and agile as a cat, a shame-faced joker with a large mouth and a squashed top hat, though at times he could play most poignantly. There was hardly any transition from the Italian comic short to the comic feature.

These were distinctly Italian. The frisky Neapolitan manners of De Riso, the shrewd witticisms of Rodolfi, the gentle humor of Bilancia and the subdued vitality if we may use such an ex- pression of Gigetta Morano — may have owed something to the pochades of Feydau in Paris, and other boulevard farceurs, but they had a cachet of their own, their own species of zaniness that was more Italianate than Gallic.

Excluded as yet from the country's national life, the people appear only in books, on the stage or on the screen. A pioneering work of this genre was the previously mentioned Lost in the Dark , which foreshadowed the French film of the thirties Quai des Brumes, etc. Of this work, Luigi Chiarini has stated that its use of montage for ironic contrast long antedated the Soviet use of this same device in the mid-twenties. Lost in the Dark was directed by Nino Martoglio, an exiled.

Sicilian writer of the naturalistic school. Luxurious and poverty stricken interiors are contrasted, as well as characters in dinner jackets and others in rags. Here the author's Bracco rhetoric is transformed into a trenchant and conclusive style. In every respect, Lost in the Dark must be considered one of the early masterworks of the Italian cinema.

There was an adaptation by Assunta Spina of a drama by Salvaotere di Giacomo the title of which I cannot find in which the image of Francesca Bertini still shines in my memory Mario and Carlo De Flaviis. In , the naturalistic film, hastened on its way by the acid bucolicism of Pirandello, already having done homage to Zola with an adaptation of Therese Raquin, now turned to Cavalleria rusticana by Verga, with, of course, Mascagni's score.

Leoncavallo's Pagliacci was also filmed and presented with the opera's music. We must at this time mention Cenere Ashes , not because it was an important film in truth it was a disastrous failure but because it starred the great Eleonora Duse. It was a 32 great disappointment to Duse. The actress soon became aware of the poetic secret of the screen, however, and of the possibilities of the film language.

The so-called advance-guard avant-garde film is also an Italian invention. The first critic who clearly defined the problem of an independent cinema esthetic was an Italian, Riciotto Canudo. This was the first aesthetic theory of photography in which the many different techniques and dev- ices, later to find their use and justification in the avant-garde cinema technique, were considered.

It was that year that Bragaglia produced the world's first avant-garde film, Perfido incanto Perfidious Enchant- ment , which made use of essentially cinematic devices to achieve photographic effects in which there was a play of abstract rhythms. It was also the year of the florescence of the innovator, Lucio D'Ambra, who made from his own novel the film in which the Countess di Frasso made an auspicious screen debut, The King, The Castles and the Bishops.

The film was one of Italy's earliest international successes. There were two types of d'Ambra films: The King, The Castles etc. Love and politics were elegantly caricatured in it, bringing to mind the couplets of La Belle Helene. Nocturnal Strauss waltzes, the Princes and Ambassadors of Franz Lehar's operetta world, and the ballet, like an army corps, all pervaded this charming work. World War I ended, and the cinema entered the postwar period.

But the war, which had truly revealed a people, did not inspire any new spiritual themes. The Italian cinema still led the world, but its evening was at hand. The foreign cinema was using a more ambitious and more direct means of expression the avant-garde films had not been a very significant experience for the Italian cinema. The lan- guage to wich the Italians had given rhythm, vigor and inspiration, became fixed, more visual and freer in foreign films. The Swedish film had begun and the Russian cinema was already a reality.

German and French films began to impose an aggressive authority. Directors and actors came back from the trenches and work resumed, full scale, in the old and new studios of Turin, Rome and Naples. Some did not return — vale, vale! Among them Lieutenant Nino Oxilia. Although Italian stars were still in fashion, and box office returns were very big, French and German competition began to be felt and, in a little while, the competition from America was such that for the first time the Italian cinema was obliged to take measures to defend its existence.

The Unione Cinematografica Italiana was founded — the most powerful cinema organ- ization in the world, with a capital of thirty millions. Don Prospero Colonna, prince and senator, was president ; Giuseppe Barattolo, managing director. Notwithstanding this impos- ing start, the organization soon went bankrupt. For the Italian cinema, this was catastrophic. The cinema is now recognized as an art. The cinema had already inspired Pirandello's restless mind with the subject of a novel, Si gira A few more spectacles, like Am- brosio's Theodora, Guazzoni's Sack of Rome and Caramba's The Borgias, managed to get produced, but America was already appealing to the public with work that was far more dynamic.

America, which had learned from Guazzoni and Pastrone, was now teaching, in her turn. Though our costume film was still unexcelled, our film language was becoming old fashioned. There were more but of them all that year only two were spectacular suc- cesses: Edouardo Scarpetta brought his sly, Neapolitan buffoonery to the screen, and a rising young new actor was talked of — Alfredo Martinelli.

Then, with a sudden resurg- ence of the Italian cinema's old strength, three new costume spectacles made their debuts: Who can forget Rina de Liguoro's enchanting seductivenes in it — which, if I will be forgiven, is an apt thing to remember in a film about Ca anova. The film had real merit, too, but Casanova dates from and we are momentarily ahead of ourselves. Before was over a crisis had set in.

The Italian cinema was exhausted. Each new film was hopefully expected to revitalize the moribund film industry but the demode film language was too much for it. Italian movie audiences had seen the new foreign films and the Italian films were no longer any competition to them. Unemployment among film stars and technicians was rife. Stars were beginning to sell their jewels. The active Ghione, who had worked so hard, fell into debt.

By , almost all the Italian studios were shut down, serving only for early morning duels between politicians and journalists, with Fausto Salvatori busily employed as a much-demanded second.

There was yet another brave attempt of the Italian cinema to lift itself by its boot-straps, as the expression goes ; a few more romances, a few more spectacles even, a film on Dante, another on Messalina and then a second Quo Vadis? To what extent this was a German film and to what extent it was an Italian film we will leave to historians to determine.

Suffice it to say that its realism and power were not to be matched in any subsequent versions made elsewhere in the world. Women were now swooning over an adventurous actor of little talent but of extraordinary handsomeness — Rudolph Valentino — who left many palpitating feminine hearts behind when he went to America to seek his fortune. To compete with the perilous, if not hallucinatory, and exultant acrobatics of Douglas Fairbanks and the derring-do of Tom Mix, both of whom had become dear to the hearts of Italian moviegoers, La Fert brought out the muscles and leaps of Luciano Albertini, Bartolomeo Pagano the Maciste of Cabiria , Boccolinindi, Gam- bino, etc.

They gallantly refused to surrender to the all too ominous portent and practically exhausted themselves trying to give the public the action for which it clamored. Even Za la Mort was launched once more in La via del peccato The Street of Sin , with fourteen stars of the first rank, but it was no use. Italian directors began to emigrate to foreign countries, followed by stars, cameramen and other technicians.

They went first to Germany and France, two countries which sub- sequently fed the American cinema. Soon most of them gravitated in one way or another to Hollywood. Fascism had come into power in Italy on October 28, In November, , the Istituto Luce became a state society for propaganda and culture through the cinema. Solidly financed, it developed rapidly. Generous legislative measures hastened the rebirth of the Italian cinema.

Rome became the seat of the Istituto Internazionale di Cinematografia Educativa. It was a powerful organ- ization but the task was formidable too — namely, to win back the Italian movie going public which was now devoted to Hollywood. Cinecitta was to rise, a gigantic mass of buildings. We were to have the Centro Speri- mentale Experimental Center for the development of new talent. The film industry was to be aided and rewarded. Venice, with its International Exhibit of Cinema Art now popu- larly known as the Venice Film Festival was to become the film capital of the world.

The public, already aware of the new vitality of the Italian cinema, began discussing the new directors and writers, as well as the new faces that were starting to appear on the screen, while the young people everywhere discussed film esthetics.

New cinemas were built to seat thousands. Mario Bonnard, no longer possessed of the old magic as a screen actor, turned director. But it was not till that there was a hint that the dawn of a new era for the Italian cinema was at hand. A young man, who had gathered around his agressive film review a 36 handful of writers and scenarists, composed a film drenched with meaning and an individual style.

He was Alessandro Blasetti and the film was Sole Sun. Another young man destined to develop a personal style appeared — Mario Camerini. He was already on his seventh film, but Rotate Wheel Tracks was his most important.

In it appeared the beauteous Hungarian actress, Kathy von Nagy. And then, with the appearance in of Canzone dell' Amove Love Song , from another Pirandello story, directed by Righelli — a spoken film — the second period of the Italian cinema began.

Ferdinando PalmIeri In Italy, as elsewhere, the cinema began with the documentary film. It lasted ten minutes. One of the first dramatic films: The widow is on the point of madness. The dying man wears a false beard. In the middle distance to the left we see the glazed wall of the studio.

In the background appears the National Institute for War Orpha7is, a witness to all this tragedy. Carlo Rosaspina - Dir. Luigi Maggi - Ambrosio, Par jure - The Woman who lied - Meineidig - Int.

Giovanni Vitrotti - Dir. Arturo Ambrosio - Ambrosio, With the advent of romantic subjects, history, adventure stories and popular serials were exploited. Gio- vanni Vitrotti - Am- brosio, Santarellina Mam'selle Nitouche - Int.

Alberto Collo - Dir. Baldassarre Negroni - Celio Film, Ermete Zacconi, Valentina Frascaroli - Op. Nata- le Chiusano - Dir. Dante Testa - Itala Film, Although looked down upon by esthetes, the cinema began to attract theater actors: The number of films increased and the number of stars was legion, while their fees constantly rose. Mario Caserini - i Ambrosio, Luigi Maggi - i Ambrosio, 1. Arrigo Frusta - Int. Giovanni Vitrotti - Ambrosio, Angelo Scalenghe - Dir. Gabriel- lino D'Annunzio - Ambrosio, 1.

But it was not with these fi! Giovanni Vithotti - Ambrosio, 1. Mary Cleo Tarlarini - Op. After , production increases and foreign markets are progressively con- quered. But it is only beginning with and that the Italian film industry produces its most famous works which cause Italian films to be sold sight unseen in foreign markets.

The titles set the tone of these films: Giovanni Spano - Op. Mario Roncoroni - Corona Films, Giu- seppe De Liguoro - Dir. Giusepfe De Li- guoro - Mtlano Film, Dante and Dumas, the Holy Scriptures and epic historical subjects. Capozzi, Mary Cleo Tarlarini - Op. The acting was theatrical and florid, but in the long shots and crowd scenes there is a shrewd sense of grouping and a crude but authentic grandeur. Mary Cleo Tar- larini - Op. Giovanni Vitrotti - Ambro- sio, Arrigo Frusta, Alberto A.

An- gelo Scalenghe - Dir. Ar- turo Ambrosio - Ambro- slo, On their golden wedding day the gallant veteran narrates to his sons and grandsons how he met his wife; the young woman who saved him when, carrying dispat- ches, he was chased by the Uhlans.

Marcantonio e Cleopatra - Int. Enrico Guazzoni - Cines, La Gerusalemme Liberata - Int. Giovanni Vitrot- ti - Dir. Luigi Mag- gi - Ambrosio, The cinema unconcernedly borrowed from the Orient as well. Costumes and scenery changed, but the tone was the same, and identical were the seductive poses and languid gestures.

Mario Caserini - Ambrosio, Rassegna stampa 8 - 23 marzo Rassegna stampa 4 - 7 marzo - Speciale Elezioni Italiane -. II - Trasmissioni tv, radio, audio-video, review. II - Trasmissioni tv, radio, audio video, riviste, web. Rassegna stampa 13 febbraio - 3 marzo II - Osservatorio globale. Politica sociale, salute, cultura, educazione giovani, lavoro. III - Trasmissioni tv, radio, audio video, riviste, web.

Rassegna stampa 21 gennaio - 12 febbraio III - Trasmissioni tv, radio, audio-video. Francia e asse franco-tedesco.

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Film x allemand escort girl ales Mario Caserini - i Ambrosio, Mary Cleo Tar- larini - Op. Spedizione a carico del destinatario. The old Italian Commedia dell'Arte came to life once more before the cameras, displaying, as before, its astonishing inventiveness, sparkling improvisation and imaginative caprices, much as did those actors of the 15th to 18th centuries whom people flocked to see in the theatres, on improvised platforms here, there or anywhere, or in the public squares. Salva Ricerca Ricerche Salvate. Arrigo Porn streaming vivastreet escort bordeaux directed for Ambrosio an adaptation of Gerolamo Rovetta's drama, Romanticismo Romanticismin which Tullio Carminati, dishevelled, suave and determined, appeared as Count Lamberti.
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FILM PORNO COMPLET ESCORT BLOIS The right word to the right person. The young century had been presented with a charming new plaything. Fregoli spoke the parts of each character and sang, when this was called for, to the accompaniment of the orchestra in the pit. Many films of the periodtherefore, were more or less academic. Though she does not love him, she believes that by marrying him she can escape to a Mediterranean paradise.
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In Margadonna gave up the cinematographic criticism and devoted himself to the activity of screenplaywriter. Italia al voto e 70 anni di Costituzione. Isa Miranda in Malombra - Regia: Esodo Pratelli - Int. Inproduction slowed down to twenty films of which at least three are worth re- membering: Aldo Fabrizi, Paola Veneroni. Kettenus, Alphonse,Stella MontiBruxelles. The cinema is now recognized as an pono francais escort salon. The middle-class Italian film of a considerably later era, with its trysts on the Pincio, its cruel loves and furious embraces, its exquisite in- teriors and aristocratic entertainments, was blood-cousin to such social chronicles as Duke Minio, or the gallantries of Piacere Pleasure. Bolchi, Sandro,I Promessi sposi. A lively interest in the cinema was aroused and encouraged by pub- lication, seminars and exhibitions, like the Venice Film Festival.

Leggere a scuola il Manifesto di Ventotene. Rassegna stampa 8 - 23 marzo Rassegna stampa 4 - 7 marzo - Speciale Elezioni Italiane -. II - Trasmissioni tv, radio, audio-video, review. II - Trasmissioni tv, radio, audio video, riviste, web. Rassegna stampa 13 febbraio - 3 marzo II - Osservatorio globale.

Politica sociale, salute, cultura, educazione giovani, lavoro. III - Trasmissioni tv, radio, audio video, riviste, web. Rassegna stampa 21 gennaio - 12 febbraio III - Trasmissioni tv, radio, audio-video. Francia e asse franco-tedesco. III Trasmissioni tv, radio, audio video, riviste, web. Rassegna stampa 21 - 30 dicembre Italia al voto e 70 anni di Costituzione. III Trasmissioni tv, radio, audio video.

Rassegna stampa 13 - 20 dicembre Spedizione a carico del destinatario. Vendo parabordo Ocean modello SoloVela NUOVO misure 60x38x19 cm colore blu navy, completo di suo copriparabordo e cimette, bellissimo e molto comodo anche come spalliera durante la navigazione, adatto per barche a vela da 30 a 55 piedi. Prezzo di acquisto euro. Euro se acquistati entrambi.

Vendo tutta la collezione di Deadpool dal numero 1 fino al Mancano solo tredici numeri: I fumetti sono in ottime condizioni! Sono disposto a vendere i fumetti solo se volete incontrarmi personalmente.

Non li mando per posta! Per informazioni potete contattarmi al numero Spese di spedizione a carico di chi acquista. Atomizzatore usato 3 mesi, confezione e accessori originali come da foto. Ritirabile di persona a Brescia e nelle vicinanze. Il Ronson standard è un accendino a benzina e venne fabbricato dal al quando venne introdotto il nuovo meccanismo "Essex".

E' stato per anni il cavallo di battaglia della Ronson ed era molto diffuso tra i gentiluomini dell'epoca. Questo accendino è stato realizzato in almeno 76 disegni. Il modello in vendita ha un disegno a righe verticali sulla faccia principale e ha la targhetta per le iniziali ancora vergine. Alcuni accendini Ronson standard non hanno il nome del modello 'standard' sul fondo e infatti questo non ce l'ha.

Si tratta di un accendino made in USA Newark. L'accendino è in ottime condizioni estetiche ed è perfettamente funzionante. Questo è un un accendino mitico prodotto negli anni ' L'accendino era stato concepito e progettato dall'industria " National" come modello "usa e getta". Tale Conrad Zellweger presento' la richiesta di brevetto per questo design nel luglio Poco tempo dopo la Ronson entro' in trattative con la National per una cessione parziale del brevetto ed un allargamento ad un progetto per un accendino di plastica automatico ,ricaricabile e assemblabile dall'alto in modo totalmente autonomo.

Mr Luis Aronson II nipote del fondatore della Ronson intendeva costruire un accendino semplice e poco costoso da mettere in competizione con i nuovi usa e getta. L'accendino pero' doveva essere ricaricabile. In base a queste trattative il design originale fu affidato a vari Stabilimenti Ronson della Corporation Usa,Inghilterra,Francia e Germania incaricate di produrre direttamente il nuovo accendino Comet, ciascuna indipendente dalle altre, ma sempre legate ai principi di cui sopra:

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